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German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherd Dog

HK$600.00
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Description

Comprehensive Genetic Wellness Checkup
Studies have shown that cats and dogs are at least 100 times more likely than human to develop genetic disorders. An animal may appear healthy now, however, it can develop genetic disease later in life and pass the defective gene to future generations. Amvet Biosciences can unlock the genetic code of DNA empowering you to plan and act proactively at an early stage.


DNA Tests for German Shepherd Include

• Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)

DM is a progressive neurological disorder that affects the spinal cord of dogs. The gene mutation has been found in more than 70 breeds. Dogs that have inherited defective genes will experience a breakdown of the cells responsible for sending and receiving signals from the brain, resulting in neurological symptoms. The disease often begins with an unsteady gait, and the dog may wobble when they attempt to walk. As the disease progresses, the dog's hind legs will weaken and eventually the dog will be unable to walk at all. DM moves up the body, so if the disease is allowed to progress, the dog will eventually be unable to hold his bladder and will lose normal function in its front legs. The onset of DM generally occurs later in life starting at an average age of about 8 years. The frequency of disease gene varies across different breeds. Pembroke Welsh Corgis, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, German Shepherd, Collie and Boxer are at the highest risk of being affected by DM.


• Hyperuricosuria (HUU) 

HUU refers to the presence of excessive amounts of uric acid in the urine. This trait predisposes dogs to form stones in their bladders or sometimes kidneys. These stones often must be removed surgically and can be difficult to treat. Hyperuricosuria is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The trait can occur in any breed but is significantly more common in Dalmatian, Bulldog and Black Russian Terrier. Affected dogs are prone to develop bladder/kidney stones. The carrier frequency of HUU in affected breeds is about 14.5%.


• Malignant Hyperthermia (MH)

Malignant Hyperthermia or malignant hyperpyrexia is an autosomal dominant genetic mutation. It is a life-threatening condition that is usually triggered by exposure to certain drugs used for general anaesthesia, specifically the volatile anaesthetic agents and the neuromuscular blocking agent. Pets predisposed to malignant hyperthermia are also sensitive to certain ingredients present in drugs and food such as caffeine. In susceptible animals, these drugs can induce a drastic and uncontrolled increase in muscle oxidative metabolism, which overwhelms the body's capacity to supply oxygen, remove carbon dioxide, and regulate body temperature, eventually leading to circulatory collapse and death if not treated quickly. Breed with the highest risk of MH includes Australian Shepherd, Collie and Long-haired Whippet. However, the carrier frequency of the disease gene in German Shepherd is about 10% and in mixed-breed dog is about 5%.


• Multi Drug and Ivermectin Sensitivity (MDR1) 

MDR1 results from a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene. This gene encodes a glycoprotein that is responsible for pumping many drugs and other toxins out of the brain. Dogs with the mutant gene cannot pump certain drugs out of the brain as a normal dog would, which may result in abnormal neurologic signs. The result may be an illness requiring an extended hospital stay or even death. This test is most commonly used for Ivermectin sensitivity but many other drugs are responsible for MDR1 symptoms. MDR1 is more common in Collies and related breeds.


How to Collect DNA Sample
1. The animal's oral cavity should be clean. It is recommended not to serve food or water 1 hour before sampling.
2. Write the name of the pet on the sampling tube.
3. Take out the swab from the sampling tube. Beware not to touch the tip (sampling area) of the swab.
4. Scrub the swab against the inside surface of the cheek (mucosa) for at least 5 seconds. Rotate the swab gently to collect cheek cells.
5. Allow the swab to air dry for 10 minutes.
6. Put the swab back to the sampling tube.
7. Repeat steps 3 - 6 to collect DNA from the other side of the cheek of the same animal .
8. Fill out the attached DNA submission form. The information should be corresponded to that on the tube.
9. Mail the DNA samples and submission form to us.

Order Information
1. The sample collection kit (including 2 DNA collection tube, 1 DNA submission form and 1 envelop with return address) (per animal) will be mailed to your address within 48 hours after we received the your order.
2. Once you have received our sample collection kit, please follow the guidelines mentioned above to finish the sample collection as soon as possible.
3. The DNA test certificate will be sent by mail and email in 12 working days after we received complete DNA samples and submission form.

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